edition:machen:005

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

edition:machen:005 [2010/12/27 22:31]
127.0.0.1 external edit
edition:machen:005 [2011/01/09 21:52] (current)
selfthinker linked Venice
Line 46: Line 46:
 I was determined never to visit Madame Orio’s house, and on that very day I held an argument in metaphysics,​ in which I contended that any being of whom we had only an abstract idea, could only exist abstractedly,​ and I was right; but it was a very easy task to give to my thesis an irreligious turn, and I was obliged to recant. A few days afterwards I went to Padua, where I took my degree of doctor ‘utroque jure’. I was determined never to visit Madame Orio’s house, and on that very day I held an argument in metaphysics,​ in which I contended that any being of whom we had only an abstract idea, could only exist abstractedly,​ and I was right; but it was a very easy task to give to my thesis an irreligious turn, and I was obliged to recant. A few days afterwards I went to Padua, where I took my degree of doctor ‘utroque jure’.
  
-When I returned to Venice, I received a note from M. Rosa, who entreated me to call upon Madame Orio; she wished to see me, and, feeling certain of not meeting Angela, I paid her a visit the same evening. The two graceful sisters were so kind, so pleasant, that they scattered to the winds the shame I felt at seeing them after the fearful night I had passed in their room two months before. The labours of writing my thesis and passing my examination were of course sufficient excuses for Madame Orio, who only wanted to reproach me for having remained so long away from her house.+When I returned to [[glossary:Venice|Venice]], I received a note from M. Rosa, who entreated me to call upon Madame Orio; she wished to see me, and, feeling certain of not meeting Angela, I paid her a visit the same evening. The two graceful sisters were so kind, so pleasant, that they scattered to the winds the shame I felt at seeing them after the fearful night I had passed in their room two months before. The labours of writing my thesis and passing my examination were of course sufficient excuses for Madame Orio, who only wanted to reproach me for having remained so long away from her house.
 As I left, Nanette gave me a letter containing a note from Angela, the contents of which ran as follows: As I left, Nanette gave me a letter containing a note from Angela, the contents of which ran as follows:
 “If you are not afraid of passing another night with me you shall have no reason to complain of me, for I love you, and I wish to hear from your own lips whether you would still have loved me if I had consented to become contemptible in your eyes.” “If you are not afraid of passing another night with me you shall have no reason to complain of me, for I love you, and I wish to hear from your own lips whether you would still have loved me if I had consented to become contemptible in your eyes.”
edition/machen/005.txt · Last modified: 2011/01/09 21:52 by selfthinker