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edition:machen:000 [2010/12/27 22:31]
127.0.0.1 external edit
edition:machen:000 [2011/08/04 21:07] (current)
jellby
Line 63: Line 63:
 Should anyone bring against me an accusation of sensuality he would be wrong, for all the fierceness of my senses never caused me to neglect any of my duties. For the same excellent reason, the accusation of drunkenness ought not to have been brought against [[glossary:​homer|Homer]]:​ <q :​la>'​Laudibus arguitur vini vinosus Homerus.'​ ((Homer'​s praise of wine convicts him of having been given to wine.))</​q>​ Should anyone bring against me an accusation of sensuality he would be wrong, for all the fierceness of my senses never caused me to neglect any of my duties. For the same excellent reason, the accusation of drunkenness ought not to have been brought against [[glossary:​homer|Homer]]:​ <q :​la>'​Laudibus arguitur vini vinosus Homerus.'​ ((Homer'​s praise of wine convicts him of having been given to wine.))</​q>​
  
-I have always been fond of highly-seasoned,​ rich dishes, such as macaroni prepared by a skilful Neapolitan cook, the olla-podrida of the Spaniards, the glutinous codfish from Newfoundland,​ game with a strong flavour, and cheese the perfect state of which is attained when the tiny animaculae formed from its very essence begin to shew signs of life. As for women, I have always found the odour of my beloved ones exceeding pleasant.+I have always been fond of highly-seasoned,​ rich dishes, such as macaroni prepared by a skilful Neapolitan cook, the [[glossary:​olla podrida|olla-podrida]] of the Spaniards, the glutinous codfish from Newfoundland,​ game with a strong flavour, and cheese the perfect state of which is attained when the tiny animaculae formed from its very essence begin to shew signs of life. As for women, I have always found the odour of my beloved ones exceeding pleasant.
  
 What depraved tastes! some people will exclaim. Are you not ashamed to confess such inclinations without blushing! Dear critics, you make me laugh heartily. Thanks to my coarse tastes, I believe myself happier than other men, because I am convinced that they enhance my enjoyment. Happy are those who know how to obtain pleasures without injury to anyone; insane are those who fancy that the Almighty can enjoy the sufferings, the pains, the fasts and abstinences which they offer to Him as a sacrifice, and that His love is granted only to those who tax themselves so foolishly. God can only demand from His creatures the practice of virtues the seed of which He has sown in their soul, and all He has given unto us has been intended for our happiness; self-love, thirst for praise, emulation, strength, courage, and a power of which nothing can deprive us—the power of self-destruction,​ if, after due calculation,​ whether false or just, we unfortunately reckon death to be advantageous. This is the strongest proof of our moral freedom so much attacked by [[glossary:​sophism|sophists]]. Yet this power of self-destruction is repugnant to nature, and has been rightly opposed by every religion. What depraved tastes! some people will exclaim. Are you not ashamed to confess such inclinations without blushing! Dear critics, you make me laugh heartily. Thanks to my coarse tastes, I believe myself happier than other men, because I am convinced that they enhance my enjoyment. Happy are those who know how to obtain pleasures without injury to anyone; insane are those who fancy that the Almighty can enjoy the sufferings, the pains, the fasts and abstinences which they offer to Him as a sacrifice, and that His love is granted only to those who tax themselves so foolishly. God can only demand from His creatures the practice of virtues the seed of which He has sown in their soul, and all He has given unto us has been intended for our happiness; self-love, thirst for praise, emulation, strength, courage, and a power of which nothing can deprive us—the power of self-destruction,​ if, after due calculation,​ whether false or just, we unfortunately reckon death to be advantageous. This is the strongest proof of our moral freedom so much attacked by [[glossary:​sophism|sophists]]. Yet this power of self-destruction is repugnant to nature, and has been rightly opposed by every religion.
edition/machen/000.txt · Last modified: 2011/08/04 21:07 by jellby